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Over the Counter: Issue No. 10

Media coverage of Sven Beckert's Empire of Cotton continues: Beckert has an essay focusing on the book in The Atlantic and is interviewed by Diane Rehm on NPR.

BackStory has an interesting episode on the railroads and the standardization of time zones, "High Noons."

The World Economic Forum blog features an essay by Simon Ville, professor of economic and business history at the University of Wollongong, on "Why We Need to Teach Economic History."

Jeremy Adelman and Jonathan Levy describe "The Fall and Rise of Economic History" in a recent Chronicle Review issue (this is gated, but viewable at the Chronicle by those whose institutions subscribe, or here, in an ungated copy).

Congratulations to Jennifer Klein of Yale University, who has been awarded the 2014 Hans Sigrist Prize by the Hans Sigrist Foundation at the University of Bern in Switzerland for her contribution to the field of “Women and Precarity: Historical Perspectives.”

We regret to report the passing of well-known economic historian John Allen James. Several of his colleagues have posted an extended Scholarly Remembrance on EH.Net, accompanied by a bibliography of his work.

Jessica Lepler of the University of New Hampshire is interviewed in the "Ask the Author" segment of the current issue of Common-Place about her book, The Many Panics of 1837 (Cambridge University Press, 2013).

The December 19 issue of the Boston Globe features a long article on the "Ice King," Frederic Tudor. It quotes, among others, Jonathan Rees of Colorado State University at Pueblo, author of Refrigeration Nation (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013).

Hagley Library's SoundCloud series, "Stories from the Stacks," recently featured Emily Buchnea on merchant networks in the Anglo-Atlantic world.

The UK's National Railway Museum has put up a web exhibit on "Railway Safety since 1913," based on research by Mike Esbester of the University of Portsmouth; one can also read Esbester's discussion of his research on the NRM blog.

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