Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Recent Prizes, Awards, and Recognition for Business Historians

A few non-BHC awards and honors for folks in the general field of business history:
The World History Association announced that Jonathan Eacott of the University of California Riverside is the co-winner of its 2017 Bentley Book Prize for Selling Empire: India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600-1830.

The Business History Review Editorial Advisory Board has announced that the winner of the 2016 Henrietta Larson Article Award (for the best article in BHR) is Sean H. Vanatta of Princeton University for "Citibank, Credit Cards, and the Local Politics of National Consumer Finance, 1968–1991" (Spring 2016): 57-80. The Vanatta article is currently free to access on Cambridge Core.

Gautham Rau of American University has been named as the new editor of the Law and History Review.

Kenneth Lipartito has been named to the Board of Editors of the American Historical Review; his primary responsibility is modern U.S. history, and he encourages business historians to submit articles to the AHR, "which is increasingly interested in works dealing with economy, business, and capitalism."

Julia Ott of the New School has been named to the Editorial Board of Dissent. She is also the co-director of the Robert L. Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at the New School, which has just received a million-dollar grant to further its programs.

Jessica Ann Levy of Johns Hopkins University has been awarded the Jefferson Scholar/Hagley Library Fellowship in Business and Politics for 2017, the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society at the Hagley Museum and Library has announced. Her dissertation, “From Black Power to Black Empowerment: American Business and the Return of Racial Uplift in the United States and Africa, 1964–1994,” examines the investments made by American business people, government officials, and black entrepreneurs on two continents in promoting free enterprise and reorienting black activism toward the market.

Charles Read, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Cambridge, was awarded both the 2017 Thirsk-Feinstein Dissertation Prize and the T.S. Ashton Prize for the best article in the Economic History Review.