Monday, March 5, 2018

CFP: Hagley Conference: “Seeing Like a Capitalist”

A call for proposals has been issued for “Seeing Like a Capitalist: Histories of Commercial Surveillance,” a conference sponsored by the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society to be held on November 8–9, 2018, at the Hagley Museum and Library. According to the convenors:
we invite proposals that explore the history of commercial surveillance in the United States, from settlement to the present. These (non-state) surveillance activities might be found in a variety of business settings and industries, involve a range of formal or informal practices, and might be directed at customers, media audiences, borrowers, consumer markets, employees, or labor. The long history of commercial surveillance serves to illuminate the precursors, continuities, and logic of today’s “surveillance capitalism.”
The conference was initiated by Josh Lauer (University of New Hampshire), and he is joined on the program committee by Roger Horowitz (Hagley Museum and Library) and Ken Lipartito (Florida International University). Proposals of no more than 500 words and a one-page CV should be submitted to Carol Lockman at clockman@hagley.org by May 1, 2018.
      Sarah E. Igo (Vanderbilt University) will open the conference with a keynote address on the evening of November 8. She will discuss her new book, The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in Modern America, to be published by Harvard University Press in May 2018.
     For more details, please see the complete call for proposals.