Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Program Available: Business History at the SHEAR Conference

SHEAR (Society for Historians of the Early American Republic) is holding its annual meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 17-20, 2014.  The program, now available online, includes many panels and papers of interest to business and economic historians.
Panels:
Session 25: "Valuing Intangibles: Experimenting with Markets in the Early Republic," chaired by Wendy Woloson
Session 35: "Women and Economic Spaces in Early Republican Philadelphia," chaired by Dallitt Hemphill [Papers for this session are available online here.]
Session 37: "Fine and Popular: The Commerce of Art in Antebellum Philadelphia," chaired by Sarah Weatherwax
Session 40: "The South American Question in the Early Republic: Diplomacy, State Building, and Political Economy"
Session 46 (Presidential Address): John L. Larson, "An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations"
Session 54: "Women and Property in Early America," chaired by Kirsten E. Wood
Individual Papers:
Session 1: Eva Sheppard Wolf, "Slavery, Capitalism, and Free Labor in the Early Republic"
Session 3: Brenden Kennedy, "Andrew Jackson and the Financing of Slavery's Expansion"
Session 17: Ariel Ron, "Bringing the Whigs Back In: Slavery, Economy and Government in the Origins of the Republican Party"
Session 18: Dael Norwood, "Commercially Informed: The Political Consequences of the Early American Consular Network in Asia"
Session 21, SHEAR Meets STEM (President's Plenary): Caitlin Rosenthal, "Math"
[A bibliography for this session is now available on the meeting website.]
Session 28: Claire Gherini, "Treating and Debating Yellow Fever in Jamaica's Credit Economy, 1788-1794"
Session 32: Hannah Farber, " 'Warranted American': Marks, Images, and the Nationalization of Commercial Property"
Session 45: Susan Gaunt Stearns, "Western Cotton, World Markets: Trade and Geopolitics of the West"
Session 53: Patrick Callaway, "The Resources with Which to Fight: The United States Government and the Failure of American Economic Strategy, 1807-1815" 
Additional information can be found on the SHEAR meeting website.